The Evolution of Disaster Recovery since 9/11

Disaster Recovery PlanDespite the fact that we thankfully haven’t fallen victim to another attack on the scale of those that happened on September 11, 2001, disaster recovery is still a huge concern for businesses throughout the U.S. With potential hurricanes, earthquakes, and the current wildfires wreaking havoc on the state of Texas, disaster recovery has gone from an occasional concern to a focal point in most corporate IT budgets.

 

Data loss can be caused by a number of catalysts beyond natural disasters, including:

 

  • human error
  • malicious acts
  • theft
  • fires
  • terrorist attacks
  • technological failures

 

All of these possibilities, if they occur, could destroy a business that is not prepared for possible disasters, and what 9/11 showed us was that business continuity plans were by and large not in place within most organizations. As such, traditional disaster recovery methods, which were slow and often not effective, have been replaced by online solutions that are faster and more secure, increasing the likelihood that a business can continue on both during and following a disaster.

 

“The whole concept before was we have a production data center and then we have the disaster recovery site and that will take 24 to 72 hours to set up and get going. Now they’re looking at making internal backups between the two. There are many institutions running data in multiple data centers throughout the day now,” said Rodney Nelsestuen, a senior research director at Tower Group.

 

The focus of corporate IT today is to ensure that workers can keep working, even if vital systems go down. IT departments are being staffed with employees whose jobs are to ensure business continuity and to “clean up” after a disaster, and those employees are looking to a variety of both traditional and cloud-based recovery solutions. Instead of housing data on-site, more and more businesses are moving their data to remote data centers and are turning to the cloud to keep it safe in the case of a local disaster.

 

Despite the significant improvements in disaster preparation and recovery, many organizations have been slow to make the move. A recent study from Symantec found that nearly half of all SMBs in the U.S. have no disaster recovery plan in place. Not only does this put business owners at risk of losing their livelihood, a solid disaster recovery plans in place can give their employees, investors, and even the media the peace of mind they need that the business will continue, despite the hardships.

 

Learn more about Zetta Data Protect, or get in touch with a Zetta representative today to find out how we can help with your disaster recovery plan.

Disaster Recovery PlanDespite the fact that we thankfully haven’t fallen victim to another attack on the scale of those that happened on September 11, 2001, disaster recovery is still a huge concern for businesses throughout the U.S. With potential hurricanes, earthquakes, and the current wildfires wreaking havoc on the state of Texas, disaster recovery has gone from an occasional concern to a focal point in most corporate IT budgets.

 

Data loss can be caused by a number of catalysts beyond natural disasters, including:

 

  • human error
  • malicious acts
  • theft
  • fires
  • terrorist attacks
  • technological failures

 

All of these possibilities, if they occur, could destroy a business that is not prepared for possible disasters, and what 9/11 showed us was that business continuity plans were by and large not in place within most organizations. As such, traditional disaster recovery methods, which were slow and often not effective, have been replaced by online solutions that are faster and more secure, increasing the likelihood that a business can continue on both during and following a disaster.

 

“The whole concept before was we have a production data center and then we have the disaster recovery site and that will take 24 to 72 hours to set up and get going. Now they’re looking at making internal backups between the two. There are many institutions running data in multiple data centers throughout the day now,” said Rodney Nelsestuen, a senior research director at Tower Group.

 

The focus of corporate IT today is to ensure that workers can keep working, even if vital systems go down. IT departments are being staffed with employees whose jobs are to ensure business continuity and to “clean up” after a disaster, and those employees are looking to a variety of both traditional and cloud-based recovery solutions. Instead of housing data on-site, more and more businesses are moving their data to remote data centers and are turning to the cloud to keep it safe in the case of a local disaster.

 

Despite the significant improvements in disaster preparation and recovery, many organizations have been slow to make the move. A recent study from Symantec found that nearly half of all SMBs in the U.S. have no disaster recovery plan in place. Not only does this put business owners at risk of losing their livelihood, a solid disaster recovery plans in place can give their employees, investors, and even the media the peace of mind they need that the business will continue, despite the hardships.

 

Learn more about Zetta Data Protect, or get in touch with a Zetta representative today to find out how we can help with your disaster recovery plan.

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