It's Hurricane Season. Can your business weather any storm?

 

 

When we talk about disaster recovery (DR), we’re often preparing for the possibility of routine power disruption or internal system failure.  But as its namesake implies, DR is also about your data surviving real disasters – the kind mother nature delivers with little warning, the kind that swirl and churn and gain strength over the ocean before moving inland over cities and towns and data centers.

 

 

 

This is the kind of disaster I’m thinking about right now as the 2010 hurricane season opened with an unusually strong first storm.  Today is Wednesday, 7 July; here in Texas where I live.  Last week we had Hurricane Alex which, thankfully, missed Texas but brought severe rain and damage to northern Mexico; including over 20 inches of rain in Monterrey.  For those of you not familiar with Mexico, Monterrey is the third largest city with significant industrial, financial and technology business.  Now NOAA (National Hurricane Center) is tracking another tropical cyclone with a 50% chance developing into something larger; and of hitting Texas.

 

That means different things to different people.  Hardware stores will stock up on plywood.  Grocery stores will be sure to fill their shelves with extra bottled water.  And enterprises should be thinking critically about their DR plans and whether they can withstand an actual natural disaster.

 

Champion Technologies of Houston, Texas, got the dubious opportunity to put its DR solutions to the test when Hurricane Ike – one of the most significant storms in U.S. history – made

landfall in 2008.  Champion, one of the fastest growing specialty chemical companies, had a hosted co-location facility in Scottsdale, Arizona, in which it protected data for its business-critical SAP ERP and Microsoft Exchange systems. 

 

The company had moved away from tape-based backup and implemented storage virtualization and provisioning technology with a multitude of capabilities, including snapshots, data replication, synchronous mirroring, and active/active failover.  When Ike hit, Champion was able to simply roll back data to a previously good state and resume operations.  Applications that might otherwise have taken two weeks to restore were up in as little as two hours.

 

Champion’s story is an important one for businesses to keep in mind this summer, especially those who are near the coast.  We’re in the midst of the season for backyard barbecues, weekends by the pool, and hurricanes. 

 

Is your enterprise ready? 

 

When we talk about disaster recovery (DR), we’re often preparing for the possibility of routine power disruption or internal system failure. But as its namesake implies, DR is also about your data surviving real disasters – the kind mother nature delivers with little warning, the kind that swirl and churn and gain strength over the ocean before moving inland over cities and towns and data centers.

This is the kind of disaster I’m thinking about right now as the 2010 hurricane season opened with an unusually strong first storm.Today is Wednesday, 7 July; here in Texas where I live.Last week we had Hurricane Alex which, thankfully, missed Texas but brought severe rain and damage to northern Mexico; including over 20 inches of rain in Monterrey.For those of you not familiar with Mexico, Monterrey is the third largest city with significant industrial, financial and technology business.Now NOAA (National Hurricane Center) is tracking another tropical cyclone with a 50% chance developing into something larger; and of hitting Texas.

That means different things to different people.Hardware stores will stock up on plywood.Grocery stores will be sure to fill their shelves with extra bottled water.And enterprises should be thinking critically about their DR plans and whether they can withstand an actual natural disaster.  

Champion Technologiesof Houston, Texas, got the dubious opportunity to put its DR solutions to the test when Hurricane Ike – one of the most significant storms in U.S. history – made

landfall in 2008.Champion, one of the fastest growing specialty chemical companies, had a hosted co-location facility in Scottsdale, Arizona, in which it protected data for its business-critical SAP ERP and Microsoft Exchange systems. 

The company had moved away from tape-based backupand implemented storage virtualization and provisioning technology with a multitude of capabilities, including snapshots, data replication, synchronous mirroring, and active/active failover.When Ike hit, Champion was able to simply roll back data to a previously good state and resume operations.Applications that might otherwise have taken two weeks to restore were up in as little as two hours.

 Champion’s story is an important one for businesses to keep in mind this summer, especially those who are near the coast.We’re in the midst of the season for backyard barbecues, weekends by the pool, and hurricanes.  

Is your enterprise ready?

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